Posts tagged “profile writing

Yogalosophy

Posted on November 13, 2013

Photo: Seal Press

Photo: Seal Press

My yoga practice has fallen apart over the past couple of months, in part because of various work projects that have kept me busy, but also because of a back injury that has been flaring up off and on during this time. With the holidays right around the corner, there is no time like now to get back on the mat (once I can move painlessly), because the breathing, twists, turns and stretches have a way of helping anyone (not just me) stay calm and focused when things get hectic.

ModernWomanThat’s my Yogalosophy, but in the recent issue of USA Today’s Modern Woman, I talked to celebrity yoga and fitness expert Mandy Ingber about hers. Ingber, a former actress, believes we already have the perfect body. It just may be hiding behind layers of fat, or (in my case) compressed spinal discs. What you have to do is love the body you have in order to get the body you want.

Ingber speaks from experience. After being “all over the map” with her own body, she overcame her own eating disorders and body image issues through the self-love she preaches. “I started making better choices as a result of loving myself,” she told me in an interview. “I used to think that if I did something wrong (like gain weight) that I ruined everything. Now I don’t have that black-and-white thinking about myself anymore.”

Now she’s known as the yoga and fitness guru behind some of Hollywood’s hottest bodies, among them, the actresses Jennifer Aniston and Helen Hunt. Her latest book, Yogalosophy: 28 Days to the Ultimate Mind-Body Makeover provides readers with an easy-to-use wellness overhaul that includes traditional yoga poses, toning and cardio exercises, recipes, music playlists, journal exercises and other action items that support physical and mental wellness throughout the day.

“This is really a ‘Start where you are, take what you like and leave the rest’ type of book,” she says. And it’s one I’ll have to reacquaint myself with very soon.

If you practice yoga, what is your favorite type of class to take and why? Or, if you’ve read Ingber’s book, what did you think of it and what sort of results did you get from following her program? And finally, what sort of fitness or wellness ideas do you have for making it through the holidays? What is your holiday-related health or wellness downfall? Please leave your insights in the comments section below.

“Retirement”

Posted on November 26, 2011

valentino
One of the more ill-considered first questions I’ve asked in an interview: “You’ve been working nonstop for five decades. What is it like for you to be a retiree?”
It was 2008 and my interview subject was fashion designer Valentino Garavani, famous worldwide for dressing some of the world’s most fashionable women (i.e. not me) in ladylike suits and gowns.
His response to my question was testy and telling:
“I am not some old man retiring. I moved in a new direction. I didn’t want to work the schedule of fashion, one that is hectic and heavy. And I have the right to do what I want.”
Yes.
Yes you do.
Please don’t hang up on me.
Part of Garavani’s new direction has been an acknowledgement of the old. A year after opening design archives at his Paris-area chateau, he will launch a virtual museum on December 5.
According to New York Magazine’s “The Cut” blog, the site:
will include 300 iconic dresses from over 50 years of Valentino’s career as a designer, including Julia Roberts’s 2001 Oscars look and Jacqueline Kennedy’s couture wedding dress, among others, all showcased in 3-D, animated galleries alongside sketches and design notes. The museum will also include an extensive media library of the fashion house’s illustrations, ad campaigns, editorials, red carpet images, and 95 fashion show videos. Should the contents be physically displayed somewhere, 107,500 square feet of space would be needed.
Valentino told New York Magazine that he sees the web site as part of his legacy. It is “important to remember things of the past, to review the fashion that has shaped our lives.”

One of the more ill-considered first questions I’ve asked in an interview: “You’ve been working nonstop for five decades. What is it like for you to be a retiree?”

It was 2008 and my interview subject was fashion designer Valentino Garavani, famous worldwide for dressing some of the world’s most fashionable women (i.e. not me) in ladylike suits and gowns.

His response to my question was testy and telling:

“I am not some old man retiring. I moved in a new direction. I didn’t want to work the schedule of fashion, one that is hectic and heavy. And I have the right to do what I want.”

Yes.

Yes you do.

Please don’t hang up on me.

Part of Garavani’s new direction has been an acknowledgement of the old. A year after opening design archives at his Paris-area chateau, he will launch a virtual museum on December 5.

According to New York Magazine’s “The Cut” blogthe site:

will include 300 iconic dresses from over 50 years of Valentino’s career as a designer, including Julia Roberts’s 2001 Oscars look and Jacqueline Kennedy’s couture wedding dress, among others, all showcased in 3-D, animated galleries alongside sketches and design notes. The museum will also include an extensive media library of the fashion house’s illustrations, ad campaigns, editorials, red carpet images, and 95 fashion show videos. Should the contents be physically displayed somewhere, 107,500 square feet of space would be needed.

Valentino told New York that he sees the web site as part of his legacy. It is “important to remember things of the past,” he said, “to review the fashion that has shaped our lives. I would call it ‘Future Memory.'”