Posts tagged “louisiana

Beanstalk

Posted on April 19, 2012

beanstalk

I have to hand it to Instagram. Their camera function is pretty good, so good that I can see I need to weed this spot where my bean plants are beginning to sprout. Peas are sprouting too. So are two different varieties of cucumbers. Tomatoes are bursting on the vine. Bell peppers are beginning to emerge. Things are starting to get interesting in my backyard plot.

Knock wood.

Five years ago, I had the power to destroy any seed I planted. These are different times. When you take the time to tend to something, to really love it and nurture it, it grows and flourishes.

I’m not necessarily talking about beans, either…

On being an alchemist

Posted on August 3, 2011

“Deep down I suspect that many gardeners regard themselves as small-time alchemists, transforming the dross of compost (and water and sunlight) into substances of rare value and beauty and power.”

–Michael Pollan, The Botany of Desire

I started a garden because I wanted to prove to myself (and perhaps to a few unnamed others) that I was no longer a plant killer. I started a garden because I wanted to grow things that I could cook and that my family and friends could eat. There is a special sort of Zen in all of this — the digging, the weeding, the planting, the watching and waiting — and I wish I had learned it sooner.

Because I am battling the hell out of this garden right now.

I spent months and months planting every square, fertilizing them accordingly, and watering, weeding, picking and replanting them as needed.  I got tomatoes earlier than expected, fresh carrots in time for my daughter’s sixth birthday, more basil than I could handle, salsa-enlivening Serrano chiles, and cucumbers upon cucumbers upon cucumbers (I owe a post about cucumbers and it’s coming). The okra I’ve been picking? Ridiculous, especially when fried (another post to come about that).

Then the rain came.

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Honeydews

Posted on July 21, 2011

honeydew

This time last week I was excited about a barely visible honeydew melon in my backyard garden. Now I’m a lot more excited, a. because this melon is much easier to see and b. because it fits neatly in the palm of my hand. Another honeydew is forming just inches from where this one sits.

I’m licking my chops.

When I moved here a year ago,

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Blueberry Hill

Posted on July 11, 2011


I went to my local farmers market recently and bought two cartons of fresh premium blueberries from Blueberry Ridge Orchard in Jackson, La. When you buy from a supermarket (which, let’s face it, I do), fruits and vegetables just lose a little something in their flavor and smell. But if you’re lucky enough to buy something that was freshly plucked from a vine, tree or plant, you’re in for a special treat.

How is this for a treat?
blueberriesOn a recent Saturday afternoon, these blueberries filled my car and my kitchen with their subtly sweet smell. Though I could have rinsed them and served them on cereal, over ice cream or mixed with other fruit, I decided to

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Signs of Life

Posted on July 11, 2011

Today my daughter informed me that you’re not supposed to run by the pool. We were not at the pool or running when she informed me. As a matter of fact, we were at home, sitting still.

But no matter!

You’re not supposed to run by the pool, she said, because you could slip and die. You’re also not supposed to run by the pool, she said, because the sign says so.

Which sign? I asked her.

“The sign with the running person covered by a red circle with a line through it,” she said. “That’s how you know you’re not supposed to do that. It is a rule.”

It is also common sense. But common sense, as we know, is not something we all have in common.

Which brings me to this sign:

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Nesting

Posted on August 1, 2010

Saturdays in St. Francisville prove that birds of a feather truly flock together.

We’ve been feathering our nest here in South Louisiana these past few weeks. More on our repatriation efforts soon.