Posts from the “Uncategorized” Category

C.S. Lewis

Posted on April 10, 2012

I’ve written here about that mythical day when I will be able to read things I want to read again without having to deconstruct any constructs or argue about any arguments. That mythical day is so close I can taste it and when it arrives it will be, let’s just say, a cause for celebration.

I took a grad school break today to read brainpickings, which is one of the few blogs I read. Today there is an interesting piece about C.S. Lewis’ Letters to Children, a book full of his correspondence with the many kids who wrote him. Lewis’ letters are full of advice that is just as useful to adults (and hags like me who are more than ready to go back to the business of being human again) as it is to the little folks who read his Chronicles of Narnia.

In a 1949 letter, Lewis writes to a little girl named Sarah, explaining that “there are only three kinds of things anyone need ever do:

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“Retirement”

Posted on November 26, 2011

valentino
One of the more ill-considered first questions I’ve asked in an interview: “You’ve been working nonstop for five decades. What is it like for you to be a retiree?”
It was 2008 and my interview subject was fashion designer Valentino Garavani, famous worldwide for dressing some of the world’s most fashionable women (i.e. not me) in ladylike suits and gowns.
His response to my question was testy and telling:
“I am not some old man retiring. I moved in a new direction. I didn’t want to work the schedule of fashion, one that is hectic and heavy. And I have the right to do what I want.”
Yes.
Yes you do.
Please don’t hang up on me.
Part of Garavani’s new direction has been an acknowledgement of the old. A year after opening design archives at his Paris-area chateau, he will launch a virtual museum on December 5.
According to New York Magazine’s “The Cut” blog, the site:
will include 300 iconic dresses from over 50 years of Valentino’s career as a designer, including Julia Roberts’s 2001 Oscars look and Jacqueline Kennedy’s couture wedding dress, among others, all showcased in 3-D, animated galleries alongside sketches and design notes. The museum will also include an extensive media library of the fashion house’s illustrations, ad campaigns, editorials, red carpet images, and 95 fashion show videos. Should the contents be physically displayed somewhere, 107,500 square feet of space would be needed.
Valentino told New York Magazine that he sees the web site as part of his legacy. It is “important to remember things of the past, to review the fashion that has shaped our lives.”

One of the more ill-considered first questions I’ve asked in an interview: “You’ve been working nonstop for five decades. What is it like for you to be a retiree?”

It was 2008 and my interview subject was fashion designer Valentino Garavani, famous worldwide for dressing some of the world’s most fashionable women (i.e. not me) in ladylike suits and gowns.

His response to my question was testy and telling:

“I am not some old man retiring. I moved in a new direction. I didn’t want to work the schedule of fashion, one that is hectic and heavy. And I have the right to do what I want.”

Yes.

Yes you do.

Please don’t hang up on me.

Part of Garavani’s new direction has been an acknowledgement of the old. A year after opening design archives at his Paris-area chateau, he will launch a virtual museum on December 5.

According to New York Magazine’s “The Cut” blogthe site:

will include 300 iconic dresses from over 50 years of Valentino’s career as a designer, including Julia Roberts’s 2001 Oscars look and Jacqueline Kennedy’s couture wedding dress, among others, all showcased in 3-D, animated galleries alongside sketches and design notes. The museum will also include an extensive media library of the fashion house’s illustrations, ad campaigns, editorials, red carpet images, and 95 fashion show videos. Should the contents be physically displayed somewhere, 107,500 square feet of space would be needed.

Valentino told New York that he sees the web site as part of his legacy. It is “important to remember things of the past,” he said, “to review the fashion that has shaped our lives. I would call it ‘Future Memory.'”

The Cheer Up Beagle

Posted on November 20, 2011

daisy

Where do I begin about the dog in this picture?

Better yet, where do I begin about the state I was in when I happened upon this dog?

I was sad in February, 2004 because I had to put down a dog that had been in my life for 14 years. I got lonely for canine company, so I started lurking in pet stores. That’s right. I was the lady who’d stare at the doggie in the window, then ask a staffer if I could just play with it for a second to see what I thought. A second would turn into…a while. And then the staffer would start gently suggesting that if I wanted to play with the dog for a good long time, I could up and buy the thing, you know. That way, I could have it forever.

I wasn’t ready for forever again.

But I kept looking just in case. One day my husband called me from work, and said he found an ad for beagle puppies that were at a veterinary clinic not too far from where we lived in Atlanta. Did I want to go check them out? You bet I did. And within hours the dog above, then a puppy, flew at me, licked my face, nibbled me and gassed me with her sweet dog breath.

Her name back then? Ginger. In those days, a black cap of fur

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Durandemonium: A Personal History

Posted on October 18, 2011

I was 14 years old when I saw my first Duran Duran concert. How long ago was that? Well, a gallon of gas cost 87 cents, Margaret Thatcher was elected British prime minister for the third time, and Prozac made its market debut. Ronald Reagan was still U.S. president and The Bangles’ “Walk Like an Egyptian” might have been the only song you ever heard on the radio.

I was about to start high school. Many of my graduate school classmates were not even born yet. The year? 1987. Duran Duran’s “Notorious” album was still a relatively new release that I listened to on a cassette tape, not a compact disc or MP3.

We did not Google or download back then.

My mother knew how much my sister and I loved Duran Duran and surprised us with tickets to see them at Merriweather Post Pavillion, just outside of Baltimore. Erasure was the opening act and I will never forget the way my mother sat there reading the A-section of The New York Times as they performed. At one point, Mom peered over the top of the newspaper to watch the band as my sister and I danced to “Victim of Love.”

When she had seen enough, she shot us a “What the hell is this?” look before going back to her reading.

Who reads the newspaper during a concert? Only my mom.

As soon as Duran Duran took the stage,

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Simon’s Dream

Posted on October 14, 2011

A few weeks ago, I wrote about my Simon Le Bon dream. Here is some footage of one of his dreams, which, sadly, does not involve me.

A post to come about this brilliant concert I saw last week at the River Center, plus some other random thoughts about and memories of this band I’ve loved since I was a wee lass.

In the meantime, if you have a chance to catch the band in concert in the next few weeks, you should jump on it. Here is a link to their coming shows.